Texture and More Texture | Pastel Painting Close-Up with Jimmy Wright

Texture and More Texture | Pastel Painting Close-Up with Jimmy Wright

Get an exclusive up-close look into the making of one of Jimmy Wright’s beautiful pastel paintings in this excerpt from The Artist’s Magazine. For a complete Q&A with the artist, plus a step-by-step pastel demonstration with Bill Hosner, a look inside a workshop with Duane Wakeham, and more, download the Pastel Painting with the Masters eMagazine for only $3.99.Ipli

ed the canvas with Golden acrylic modeling paste; I wanted the surface to resemble an old plaster wall. Then I primed the surface with two coats of Golden acrylic gesso. Throughout Roses in a Jar (oil, 56×44), smooth texture plays against rough texture.

Originally entitled Roses on Earth, this picture’s predominant tone was burnt umber. I reshaped the composition when I painted over it

.pastel-painting-Jimmy-Wright-012616b.jpg

  1. To create the salmon-colored backdrop, I used a large, viscous amount of Vasari Classic artists’ oil. The paint was thick and stiff enough to retain the marks of the bristle bright brush.
  2. The roses, painted with subtle changes of value, are a mixture of both smooth (B) and heavily impastoed forms (C). Though I frequently use

Playing Up the Drama in Watercolor Painting | Laurie Goldstein-Warren

Playing Up the Drama in Watercolor Painting | Laurie Goldstein-Warren

“Like most of us, I was taught in watercolor painting to work light to dark,” says West Virginia artist Laurie Goldstein-Warren. “But by the time I’d crafted a well-drawn composition, meticulously saved my whites and established gorgeous lights, I was afraid of ruining all that good work with an errant stroke of arguably the scariest values on the scale. I’ve since learned that the best way to overcome this hindrance to a truly successful watercolor painting is to face my fears head-on and go straight in with the darkest darks.”

View a gallery of the artist’s paintings that resulted from using this technique below.

watercolor-still-life-Laurie-Goldstein-Warren

Mardi Gras Beads (watercolor on paper) by Laurie Goldstein-Warren

Pastel Pick of the Week | IAPS (and You) at Salmagundi

Pastel Pick of the Week | IAPS (and You) at Salmagundi

a_Christopher17

What’s on your easel? Is it new and bold? Inventive and inspired? Flat out stunning? And how would it look framed and hanging in a show at the Salmagundi Club? Don’t miss your chance to make it happen! The International Association of Pastel Societies (IAPS) has recently announced the Call for Entries for their 28th IAPS Juried Exhibition, which will be hosted at the historic New York City club this June (6th to 17th).

Visit the IAPS website to find the prospectus with all the information and criteria you need to know; plus the show schedule; the lineup of prizes; and information about the jurors of selection Richard McKinley, Chris Ivers, and myself; and the Juror of Awards Jimmy Wright.

Is the piece on your easel not quite there yet? No worries. The entry deadline is March 20, 2016, so there is still time for masterpiece-making!

How Art Can Change Your Home

How Art Can Change Your Home

Changing how your home looks and the atmosphere within isn’t always easy, nor is it always within your budget to do so. Repainting, putting down new flooring, and replacing your furniture can change how a room feels, but it’s also a good amount of work. In the case of painting and changing the flooring, it may render the room unusable for several days. These are also permanent changes, and you may not be ready to go quite that far yet. However, you can use artwork to achieve a similar effect while still being able to change the room again at any time. Here are a few things art can do for the look and feel of your home.

It Adds a Focal Point

If you add a large canvas to a room, it’s going to draw the eye, especially if it’s full of bright colours. Adding art can help you direct people into a room and pull their focus to one point of it. Perhaps you don’t want someone to see the old sofa against one wall or don’t want them to look out the windows and see the mess in your yard. By putting a

Introduction to Encaustics

Introduction to Encaustics

Landscape Painting with Wax: It’s So Easy!

Learn how to paint an abstract landscape using encaustics. If you’ve never painted with wax before, this medium has some exciting possibilities that makes it both fun (and easy) to work with, as well as creating some really cool effects.

In Encaustic Adventure with Bela Fidel (Parts 1 and 2): Preparation & Layering, Bela reviews the encaustic supplies and safety (especially important when working with hot materials) you’ll need, then demonstrates color mixing and layering to achieve stunning results. Once you have the supplies and paint techniques down, Bela takes you through the steps to create an abstract landscape painting using layers of color and a variety of application techniques.

You’ll love learning the paint techniques used in encaustics, and abstract art is a fun way to learn how to adapt encaustics to landscape painting without worrying too much about capturing exactly what you see.

Preview Encaustic Adventure with Bela Fidel (parts 1 and 2) now to learn about what encaustic supplies you’ll need to get started, as well as how to begin layering your colors. Then, head over to ArtistsNetwork.tv for the full-length workshop, materials lists,

Untangle your Creativity with Mindful Doodling!

Untangle your Creativity with Mindful Doodling!

Create Beautiful Doodle Art

If your creativity feels all tied up in knots, that might actually be a good thing! Now is a great time to try your hand at doodle art with purpose, as we wrap up Doodle December. With a ton of new tangle patterns and projects, you’ll love starting off the new year with a new project!

If you’re new to the idea of zentangle and the art of doodling, you can learn the basics with Tiffany Lovering. In Tangle Love Workshop: Zen Doodle Basics, you’ll learn 15 basic doodle patterns and ways of using stencils to create your borders and designs.

In Tangle Love Workshop: Create Original Patterns, you’ll learn how to create your own original patterns, drawing inspiration from the patterns you’ll see everywhere around you.

But you won’t stop there, because soon enough, you’ll be applying those patterns to all kinds of projects, from shoes and t-shirts to ornaments and mugs, for great, one-of-a-kind gifts and keepsakes that combine form and function.

Or, check out Kass Hall’s new videos at ArtistsNetwork.tv, along with her book, Zentangle Untangled, for great instruction on all the benefits of Zentangle! It’s

Manic for Mandalas

Manic for Mandalas

Mandalas for Beginners

In this brand new course, Mandalas for Beginners, you’ll go manic for mandalas. You will learn the basic technique of creating symmetrical mandalas with great designs and fun colors.

Throughout this four-week course, Tiffany will teach you how to create unique mandala templates, how to create tangle patterns in the mandala, and how to perfectly shade your mandala with complementary colors.

By the end of the course, you will create a unique, ready-to-frame 6″ mandala. Plus you’ll have a new understanding of mandalas and tools to create many more handcrafted mandalas on your own. You can take this course in the comfort of your own home, with step-by-step video instruction from Tiffany each of the four weeks. Mandalas for Beginners is designed for artists with little experience with Mandalas and who want to learn a new creative art form.

Enjoy other tangle Artist’s Network University courses with Tiffany

In the Artist’s Network University course, Beginning the Art Tanglingyou will learn the relaxing art of tangling. In this four-week course, you will learn 30 unique tangle patterns and you will start with beginner techniques and patterns then advance to intermediate level tangling.

In

Get Out of Your Own Way

Get Out of Your Own Way

Sitting at my kitchen table, with a book on abstract art taking center stage on my laptop’s screen, there’s movement to my left, just outside of the double window. On my front porch, one of the empty rocking chairs is gently moving forward and back, ignoring the lack of a person within its seat. I see that the wind is blowing a whisper that makes the trees sway as well, and suddenly, as I read the words of the book’s author, a new idea comes to my mind.

It has nothing to do with abstract art, rocking chairs, or wind. Such is the nature of inspiration.

But I do believe that reading about the abstract art techniques of Debora Stewart helped spark the idea that I’m going to put into action. I had read through several pages of her book, Abstract Art Painting: Expressions in Mixed Media, and took it all into consideration. The sentence that made me stop in my tracks was simply, “You [may] start out to create a horizontal rectangular work and end up with a vertical work.” Before I knew it, I was making written notes about a piece that I’ve been

Drawing Anatomy Lesson: How to Draw Hands

Drawing Anatomy Lesson: How to Draw Hands

Today we bring you Jon deMartin’s lesson on drawing anatomy, specifically, how to draw hands. It comes from his new book, Drawing Atelier: The Figure. We’ll begin with one of my favorite quotes from Jon: “Whether emphasizing line, value or both, the more techniques you have in your arsenal, the more you can exercise your imagination–your most valuable asset of all.”

Drawing Anatomy: How to Draw Hands by Jon deMartin

The series of drawings below shows the stages of hands drawn in different positions, all following the same basic steps. This approach goes back hundreds of years.

To practice, first try tracing the outline of your own hand on the paper to give yourself a “live” model of a hand’s proportions. Start with simple views and build to more complex ones.

Drawing hands well (or anything else for that matter) requires a deep understanding of structure and perspective, as well as many years of study. These are the hallmarks of true classical drawing. But far from being constrictive, a classical approach will let you enjoy more freedom than you ever thought possible.

Stage 1: Light lines are used to describe the large sweeping

Abandoned House | by Ephraim Rubenstein

Abandoned House | by Ephraim Rubenstein

When I lived in Richmond, Virginia, we often spent the summers on the Northern Neck, a long spit of land bounded by the Potomac River to the north and the Rappahannock to the south. Initially, I found it an unprepossessing area, patchworked together by the relatively poor truck farms of the locals and vacation homes for the wealthy gentry from Richmond and Washington, D.C. My first impressions of the area were not favorable; I found the brackish land to be too flat, monotonous, and scrubby.

The Abandoned House

Remarkable for me, however, was the recurring presence of an abandoned house, a number of old structures left to collapse in the middle of their respective farmlands. The demographics of the area were such that when the farmers’ children grew up, they moved off to the cities, leaving no one to work the farms. Then when a farmer died, the abandoned house was left to fall apart and litter the landscape like a wooden carcass.

Fertile Metaphor

I remembered Kenneth Clark’s notion that landscape painting was supposed to engender “a sense of well-being”: a peaceful, life-enhancing feeling that God’s in His Kingdom and all’s right on the earth. Well, an abandoned house

To Make Abstract Art, Do This

To Make Abstract Art, Do This

How to Make Abstract Art: A Tip for Beginners

As an experimental artist, it is easy to take off in some exciting new direction every time a new inspiration comes my way. For the first few years that I painted, this was exactly what I did and in many ways it served me well. I explored a wide variety of materials, experimented with many exciting techniques and taught myself quite a bit about what did and did not work. Yet, it seemed that although I had a lot of good starts, and some decent middles, I consistently found my paintings lacking by the time I reached the end.

Experimentation by its very nature implies a degree of failure. Think of Thomas Edison and his legendary thousands of tries at a light bulb. Yet, even before he had succeeded, he is quoted as saying, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”Failure in this sense has great value as it is a means of instruction and learning. Still, as artists we tend to get discouraged if, after hours at a painting, we have only discovered what doesn’t work. This got me to thinking,

A Mixture of Awe, Inspiration and Frustration | Drawing Basics

A Mixture of Awe, Inspiration and Frustration | Drawing Basics

I’m usually pretty good at keeping secrets, but Sarah Parks has one that’s too good not to share. Actually, she has several, and they all involve one thing: drawing basics.

We’ll get to that in a moment, but first I want to tell you that Sarah’s Drawing Secrets Revealed is part of an exclusive Master Portrait Painting and Drawing digital collection of step-by-step drawing lessons, exercises, and techniques. Order today, and you’ll receive the following resources:
• Drawing Secrets Revealed (eBook)
• The Art of Portrait Drawing (eBook)
• Drawing Realistic Clothing and People (eBook)
• Painting Beautiful Skin Tones with Color and Light (eBook)
• Painting Classic Portraits  (eBook) and
• Top 10 Art Techniques: Portraits (DVD)

Back to Sarah’s drawing ideas and her secret to simple drawings. Here’s what she has to say about being an artist and feeling a range of emotions throughout your experience. Keep reading to discover one of her drawing secrets, and learn how you can win two drawing books and a five-year annual CD from The Artist’s Magazine

“If you’re like most new artists,” Sarah says, “you see a beautiful finished sketch or drawing and you think, I want to do that! But you

Painting Tips: The Value of Hard and Soft Edges

Painting Tips: The Value of Hard and Soft Edges

Handling edges is a skill that all fine artists will need to learn sooner or later. Edges that are out of focus are vital in paintings in order to create the 3D illusion of making things look like they recede in a landscape painting, for example. Edges that are blurred make things appear they are moving.

The handling of edges is to be applied in all mediums, although some are more cooperative than others. For example, with pastels all you need to do is massage the dust with your finger and you can achieve any degree of softness, whereas in acrylics the paint dries too fast and it’s impossible to blur, like with oils. Watercolor requires experience to know exactly when to apply the pigment to the wet paper.

Painting Tips for Artists

There are three kinds of edges in all mediums:

Diffused Edges
The contour of forms can become completely lost, leaving little or no definition. Use diffused edges for the following:
• The last plane in your background, when indicating foliage
• To create ethereal cumulous clouds
• To create realistic waterfalls that appear to be moving
• To indicate crashing waves in seascapes

It Doesn’t Sound Like Something You’d Paint With | Acrylic Painting Idea

It Doesn’t Sound Like Something You’d Paint With | Acrylic Painting Idea

You’ve asked for it, and we’re thrilled to bring it to you–the newest issue of Acrylic Artist is now available in print or digital. Editor-in-Chief Patty Craft wants to remind you that this magazine is yours! If there’s a talented acrylic artist on your radar that we should know about, tell us! Simply email his/her website to us at aaedit@fwcommunity.com, and feel free to share your feedback on Acrylic Artist with our team.

To celebrate the new issue, here’s an excerpt from Tesia Blackburn’s article on using clear tar gel. I’ll be honest; I hadn’t heard of this before reading about it in Acrylic Artist. If it’s new to you, too, then I’m sure you’ll appreciate Tesia’s guidance!

Acrylic Painting Technique: Using Clear Tar Gel

Clear tar gel is a unique polymer medium that is described as having a long rheology. The term rheology refers to the flow of polymers, primarily in a liquid state. What this means when describing clear tar gel is that it is extremely stringy and syrupy. It has a honey-like consistency that makes it wonderful to work with in the studio. I have a variety of ways I like to use

Attention Urban Sketchers: Get your Sketches Published in Our New Coloring Book!

Attention Urban Sketchers: Get your Sketches Published in Our New Coloring Book!

Readers have asked for more, more and more coloring books and inspiration. We are hoping urban sketchers like YOU will answer the call! We are putting together a uniquely crave-worthy collection of urban sketches to color, crowdsourced from every corner of the world and we want to include your work!

What We Are Looking For:

  • Rich and detailed original works of art that depict urban scenes, people, buildings, etc.
  • Sketches only – preferably pen and ink line art only – we will not be accepting colored scenes.
  • Images submitted must be at least 300 dpi and at least 8 x 10. Both landscape and portrait orientations are acceptable.

To Submit:

  • Email a digital copy (TIFF or JPG preferred) of your sketch (or sketches) to urbansketch@fwcommunity.com no later than February 29, 2016.
  • Be sure to include your name, physical address and email address in the body of your email.
  • Include the name of the location your sketch depicts in the body of your email.
  • You may submit as many sketches for consideration as you would like.
  • There is NO SUBMISSION or ENTRY FEE.

About the Selection Process:

A team of experienced North Light Fine Art editors will review all

Plein Air Palettes

Plein Air Palettes

Plein Air Palettes

Feeling mischievous? Ask a group of outdoor painters what colors are best for painting landscapes—and then sit back and enjoy the show! Some painters will argue until the cows come home over what blue is best. There are, however, some basic considerations when selecting a plein air palette.

Practical Considerations

First, think of weight. Although I do know one painter who claims to take 40 colors to the field, most painters take only a few. Paint is heavy. For a plein air palette, you don’t need the full set of colors you may use in your studio.

Second, think of the physical size of your actual palette or mixing area. I tell my students that their physical palettes for plein air should be as big as the surfaces upon which they’re painting. Because most outdoor painters work small, their plein air palettes should be small, too. This is another reason to limit the colors you take.

So which colors do you take? Let’s explore the possibilities by taking a look at my Southern Head series. Only one painting in this series was actually created en plein air on Grand Manan Island

Which is More Important: Value or Color?

Which is More Important: Value or Color?

The overriding theme of my artwork is the interaction between architecture and nature,” Michael says. “I’m ceaselessly fascinated by the interplay of architectural subjects in their natural milieu, be it city or countryside. In this book, I tap into my architectural background to give you tips, tricks and ideas for how to imbue your architectural watercolors with light and color.”

Scroll down for an exclusive excerpt that addresses color and value.

From “Watercolor Techniques”

Value Versus Color

There’s an ongoing debate regarding the relative importance of value versus color in representational painting. Many artists feel that a value plan is all that’s necessary. For them, color is subsidiary to value. Colorists, on the other hand, feel that color is most critical and that patterns of color make a successful painting and that the value scale is intrinsic in the colors.

I’m not going to take sides in this debate, although I lean toward the values argument. The more I paint and teach, the more I believe a strong value plan is imperative. Even after decades of painting, I continue to do a pencil value study prior to every painting. With my values determined,

Drawing Basics: What Masters DO that Amateurs DON’T

Drawing Basics: What Masters DO that Amateurs DON’T

Drawing Basics: What Masters DO that Amateurs DON’T

Carol Leather adores her granddaughter and wanted to freeze that young energetic spirit. But when she created a portrait of six-year-old Beth, it laid lifeless on the page, flat, out of proportion and missing the personality that this perky child exudes. It didn’t even look like a little girl; Carol had aged the portrait.

Here are the common drawing mistakes Carol made that you might be making, too:

  1. She put the eyes in the center of the face, which isn’t where eyes line up on a child’s face.
    • As people age, eyes move to different positions.
    • Carol’s drawing proportions were off, so the likeness eluded her.
  2. Carol used just two pencils for the hair, instead of a wide range multifarious tones found in natural hair.
    • Even blonde hair has super dark values.
    • In her final portrait she used 12-18 pencils to create depth in hair.
  3. She used just one pencil for the skin tones, which makes the face look flat.
    • In her second portrait, she used 12-18 pencils to help the face take on dimension.
  4. She used white drawing paper.
    • It takes 200% longer to draw portraits

Colored Pencil Step-by-Step: Arlene Steinberg

Colored Pencil Step-by-Step: Arlene Steinberg

Colored pencil paintings by Arlene Steinberg have appeared many times in The Artist’s Magazine. See her feature article in the April 2016 issue. Following is a bonus step-by-step colored pencil demonstration by Arlene Steinberg:

Colored pencil is translucent, so as you layer and blend colors, those in the lower layers show through, allowing you to create luminous effects and subtle shifts of value and hue. This takes time, but working on a heated Icarus Art drawing board cuts the time drastically. In this step-by-step demonstration I identify Prismacolor Premier colored pencils with a “P” and Caran d’Ache Luminance 6901 colored pencils with an “L.”

Step-by-Step Colored Pencil Demonstration

  1. After transferring my compositional drawing onto the paper, I colored the curled stem white with Caran d’Ache Neocolor II water-soluble crayon. I then placed drafting tape along the line indicated in image 1 to preserve the back edge of the table. After this, I covered the entire drawing with a sheet of frisket film. Then, with an X-acto knife, I cut away the portion of the frisket covering the background. At this point, I taped my paper surface to the warm side of the Icarus board and turned the board

The Reasons Your Art Business Could Fail

The Reasons Your Art Business Could Fail

When it comes to visual arts, it’s a good idea to compare your understandings and practices with similar interests, especially when it comes to art business. You can model your own practices on the successes of those before and around you. That’s why, although we know you come to ArtistsNetwork mainly for drawing and painting techniques and inspiration, I want to share with you some art business advice from our Photographer’s Market  friends. Read this advice from editor Mary Bostic and contributor Vik Orenstein for info that can propel your own success when you want to sell your art.

“Love it or hate it, dealing with money is a key component to running a successful photography business,” Mary advises. “While your passion for shooting is why you became a photographer, competently handling your income and outgo allows you to keep doing what you love.

“If handling money isn’t your strength, we’re here to help. This edition of Photographer’s Market includes articles on pricing your work, selling without begging, obtaining micro funding for your business, and options for accepting payment from your clients.

“You’ll also find features on a variety of topics to help keep your